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Thursday, January 3, 2013

The Mystery of Tiwanaku / Phase 14

 

The Tiwanaku believed Viracocha created people out of rock.  One story has it that Viracocha created giants to move the massive stones that comprise much of Tiwanaku’s heaviest construction projects.  Then Viracocha grew unhappy with the giants and caused a flood to destroy them.  People of this time were for the most part simple minded and uneducated and could be swayed easily by propaganda and superstition generated by their leaders and priests.  These giants would have to have been extremely tall to cross Lake Titicaca from the Copacabana Peninsula to Tiwanaku to deliver the stones.  Therefore they would have had to been able to fly as well.  Here we go from one extreme to another-the story does not make any sense.

 

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Tiwanaku Giant

As the story goes, Viracocha rose from Lake Titicaca during the time of darkness to bring forth light. He made the sun, moon, and the stars.  Since he was an Ancient Astronaut he had to take on the persona of a god, he had to be presented with these awesome powers.  He made humankind by breathing into stones, but his first creation were brainless giants that displeased him according to the story.  Why did he make giants and why brainless?  It could have been a failed genetic experiment. Therefore, they destroyed them. Apparently, the Ancient Astronauts had decided to make more clones for the local population.  Size and strength may have been necessary for the work but they lacked the intelligence needed carry out the task.  Therefore, those were destroyed and strength was swapped for brainpower.  No one knows how 160-ton rocks were transplanted to the megalithic site.  Without modern technology, how did they do it?  I do not believe reed boats would have transported 160-ton stones over the lake.  Either you would have one very large boat of gargantuan size or you would have a large fleet of hundreds of small boats to do it.  The task of moving a 160-ton stone across land seems even harder to do unless it was broken up into many pieces and then moved with what was available. The two new clones became Tiwanaku priests and through futuristic technology directed the building projects using spacecraft to carry the stones:

 

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Spacecraft transporting construction stones

The stones were moved by the command of two priests according to one theory.  To the people they appeared to have the ability to defy the laws of gravity.  Magnetism of some sort (a tractor beam) was used in moving these huge megalithic stones.  The only explanation for this is they had contact with ET or were Ancient Astronauts themselves.
Pumapunku is located .63 miles northwest of Tiwanaku proper. Pumapunku also called "Puma Pumku" or "Puma Puncu"; it is part of a large temple complex or monument group that is located not for from the main site at Tiwanaku.   In Aymara, its name means, "The Door of the Cougar". The Pumapunku complex consists of an un-walled western court, a central un-walled esplanade, a terraced platform mound that is faced with megalithic stone, and a walled eastern court.

 

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Tiwanaku Andesite rock quarry

In about 530 A. D. construction of Pumapunku began.  Originally, it consisted of series of platforms with a temple in the middle of the city.  Water would have surrounded some of the platforms where cut stone would be brought in from Lake Titicaca after being excavated on the Copacabana peninsula. These would be Andesite un-worked stone blocks.

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Stone Route to Tiwanaku

Small tonnage rough-cut stone could have been transported by boat (or raft if large timber were available) to Pumapunku put on a platform where the local artisans would carve the rock. From there it could be put back on a boat or raft and moved by canal to the unloading or building location.  The canals could be dug extending from Lake Titicaca inland.  Llamas could be tethered to the boats or rafts to bring them farther up the canal from a path on either side of the canal.  If llamas were unable to do it then human slaves were used to do it.

 

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Tiwanaku and local vicinity map

The Lake would have been much higher at this time than today and it would have been easy to transport the rock to the designated site by canal.  Looking at the map above you can see what the area looks like today it would be ideal for canals to be made to bring in the cut stone blocks.   There is plenty of swamp and small lakes in the area today and  at least two rivers or streams in the area.  However, not all these stones were transported in this manner as already stated.  They needed outside help to transport stones over 40 tons.  Based on the Ancient Astronaut premise.

 

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Pumapunku platform area

Pumapunku is a terraced earthen mound that is faced with megalithic blocks.

 

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Pumapunka Megalithic Blocks

Pumapunku is 167 m wide along its north-south axis and 117 m long along its east-west axis.

 

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Pumapunku Temple Terraces being excavated

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Pumapunka platforms

On the northeast and southeast corners of the Pumapunku are 20-meter wide projections that extend 27 meters north and south from the rectangular mound. The eastern edge of the Pumapunku is occupied by what is called the "Plataforma Lítica."

 

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Pumapunku Temple Reconstruction

The Plataforma Lítica consists of a stone terrace that is 7 by 39 meters in dimension. This terrace is paved with multiple enormous stone blocks. The Plataforma Lítica contains the largest stone slab found in both the Pumapunku and Tiwanaku Site. This stone slab is 8 meters long, 5 meters wide and averages 1 meter thick. Based upon the specific gravity of the red sandstone from which it was carved, this stone slab has been estimated to weigh 131 metric tons.   Not something, that could easily be brought up a canal by a boat.

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An Overlooking view of Pumapunku's structures

Excavations at the Pumapunku have documented “three major building epochs, in addition to small repairs and remodeling.

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Pumapunku tiled room floor

At its peak, Pumapunku is thought to have been "unimaginably wondrous", adorned with polished metal plaques, brightly colored ceramic and fabric ornamentation, trafficked by costumed citizens, elaborately dressed priests and elites decked in exotic jewelry. Current understanding of this complex is limited due to its age, and the lack of a written record, which has not been deciphered or discovered yet.

 

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Pilgrims at the Temple of Pumapunku

Determining the age of the Pumapunku complex has been a focus of researchers since the discovery of the Tiwanaku site. As noted by Andean specialist, Anthropology Professor W. H. Isbell, a radiocarbon date was obtained by Vranich from lowermost and oldest layer of mound fill forming Pumapunku. This layer was deposited during the first of three construction epochs.  It dates the initial construction of  Pumapunku at 536–600 A. D.

 

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Aerial View of Pumapunku